Thursday, March 5, 2015

Film Review: Navy Seals

  
"In the 1990's film "Navy SEALs," Charlie Sheen and Michael "Terminator" Biehn lead an elite cadre of Naval Spec Ops Warriors into terrorist territory for a series of sensational shoot-'em-ups on land and at sea."
Essential it's "Top Gun" with water ! For a point of reference The real Navy SEALs were formed in 1962 by President Kennedy however their roots date back to WWII with the brave men of The UDT. The Seals are an amphibious clandestine force, America's Secret Weapon, they are trained to be expert in all kinds of Warfare-- on sea, air or land, hence "SEAL." This film is more of the fantasy version of the SEAL squadron. Picture -- "The Dirty Dozen" with styling gel -- In this film, the team is called in to dispatch some Arab terrorists, which they do, breaking no sweat. However they inadvertently let the biggest bad guy go, and because they are pressed for time, neglect to blow up a cache of stolen U.S. hand-held Stinger guided missiles. So, after disdainfully suffering the indignity and bumbling of standard military intelligence, the SEALs are allowed to go back in and do it right.
Charlie Sheen is the arrogant company hot head, while co star Biehn is the equally arrogant fair-haired boy. Of course, Sheen blows it big time, and has to redeem his recklessness by film's end. Unfortunately we never get to know the other characters in this film very well -- maybe that's so we won't miss them when they're goners. One thing that rings true is that Sheen and Biehn get involved in a romantic duel of sorts over a Lebanese-American journalist (Joanne Whalley-Kilmer), but then, they learn she has important top secret inside information.
Despite the script having lots of plot holes and bad dialogue the film still is loaded with high-tech weaponry, secret code words, neat stunts and nearly nonstop blowups, blood and guts, "Navy SEALs" is an effective, adrenaline-injecting summer action flick that will leave you clenching your teeth and hating The Enemy in spite of yourself.